Moon News  





. Michelin Develops Lunar Wheel For NASA Moon Rover Vehicles

Based on the award-winning MICHELIN TWEEL assembly, the MICHELIN Lunar Wheel maintains flexibility and constant ground contact pressure that enables moon rovers to traverse loose soil and lunar craters. The MICHELIN Lunar Wheel has a low mass yet maintains a high load capacity that is 3.3 times more efficient than the original Apollo Lunar Rover wheels.
by Staff Writers
Greenville SC (SPX) Nov 17, 2008
Michelin has developed a new lunar wheel for the next generation of NASA moon rover vehicles. The structurally supported tire and wheel assembly, made of breakthrough composite materials, was jointly developed at Michelin's European and North American research centers.

This unique innovation will help Michelin meet NASA's mobility challenges for manned and un-manned moon missions planned for the coming decade.

"Michelin has partnered with NASA for more than 20 years to provide tires for the space shuttle, and now we are taking our involvement a step further in support of the next generation of space exploration," said David Stafford, chief operating officer of Michelin Americas Research Company.

"This project demonstrates Michelin's ability to engineer advanced technology that meets the mobility needs of the world's most demanding customers, including NASA."

Based on the award-winning MICHELIN TWEEL assembly, the MICHELIN Lunar Wheel maintains flexibility and constant ground contact pressure that enables moon rovers to traverse loose soil and lunar craters. The MICHELIN Lunar Wheel has a low mass yet maintains a high load capacity that is 3.3 times more efficient than the original Apollo Lunar Rover wheels.

The wheel structure, developed by Michelin, employs Michelin-patented composite materials. Its textile tread, developed in conjunction with Clemson University and Milliken and Company, enables moon rovers to maintain traction at very low temperatures.

"This new technology not only applies to lunar missions, but may also be directly leveraged into other mobility applications requiring light-weight and low rolling resistance," said Stafford. "It's an exciting advance for mobility in space and here on Earth."

Funded in part by a grant from NASA's Innovative Partnership Program, the MICHELIN Lunar Wheel will be featured on the Scarab Rover, a lunar robot designed by Carnegie Mellon University, in cooperation with NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program for its In-Situ Resource Utilization project.

Equipped with a drill designed to cut through layers of lunar soil, the Scarab Rover is capable of operating in continual darkness and extremely cold temperatures with little power. Michelin has also developed a lunar wheel for the ATHLETE Rover, a six-limbed lunar rover capable of transporting cargo over any terrain to aid NASA in the assembly of the lunar outpost.

"Michelin's team of scientists and engineers worked closely with our design team to create a solution that addresses the unique challenges of lunar exploration," said Jaret B. Matthews, NASA's principal investigator for the development of the MICHELIN Lunar Wheel.

"The MICHELIN Lunar Wheel successfully exceeds our initial design targets."

The MICHELIN Lunar Wheel will undergo field-testing on the Scarab Rover in Hawaii from Oct. 31 through Nov. 13, 2008 as part of a NASA Lunar Analogs testing and evaluation event. The terrain, rock distribution and soil materials of Hawaii's Big Island provide high-quality simulation of the lunar polar region.

Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Michelin North America
Mars News and Information at MarsDaily.com
Lunar Dreams and more




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
NASA Restores Historic Lunar Orbiter Image
Moffett Field CA (SPX) Nov 17, 2008
NASA released a newly restored 42-year-old image of Earth on Thursday. The Lunar Orbiter 1 spacecraft took the iconic photograph of Earth rising above the lunar surface in 1966. Using refurbished machinery and modern digital technology, NASA produced the image at a much higher resolution than was possible when it was originally taken.

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



  • Space Researchers Developing Tool To Help Disoriented Pilots
  • Kazakh Astronaut To Fly To ISS, Russian Hopeful Grounded
  • Volan Escape System To Rescue Space Crews
  • CU-Boulder To Launch Butterfly, Spider K-12 Experiments

  • Mars Rover Team Sets Low-Power Plan For Spirit
  • Planetary Society Steps Beyond Moon For Roadmap To Space
  • India to take second moon shot by 2012, eyes Mars
  • Controllers Cheer As Data Arrive from NASA's Spirit Rover



  • Seeing A Distant Planet
  • Hubble Snaps Exoplanet Orbiting Nearby Star
  • Dusty Shock Waves Generate Planet Ingredients
  • MIT Researchers Find Clues To Planets' Birth

  • MU Scientists Go Green With Gold, Environmentally Friendly Nanoparticles
  • Scientists Create Balloon One Atom Thick
  • Rosnanotech Aims For 157 Billion Dollars In Output By 2015
  • New Nano-Positioners May Have Atomic-Scale Precision

  • USRA Division Of Space Life Sciences Celebrates 25th Anniversary
  • A card swipe machine may test for diseases
  • Officials: Cadavers used in NASA project
  • Researcher Seeks To Protect Muscles Of Astronauts

  • Sea Launch Prepares For Launch Of SICRAL 1B
  • Ariane 5 Is Readied For Arianespace's Initial Mission Of 2009
  • ILS Proton Successfully Launches ASTRA 1M Satellite
  • Russia Set To Launch SES Telecoms Satellite

  • NASA's New Ares Rocket Engine Passes Review
  • NASA to test Orion launch abort system
  • First Rocket Parts Of NASA's New Launch System Arrive In Florida
  • Copenhagen Suborbitals Tests Hybrid Rocket

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2007 - SpaceDaily.AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement